StereoPi v2

by StereoPi

The open-source stereoscopic camera based on Raspberry Pi with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and an advanced powering system

View all updates Apr 09, 2021

Bees and Birds Can See the UV Spectrum. With HQ Cameras, Now You Can Too!

by Eugene Pomazov

UV- and visible-spectrum photographs of a sunflower

The light spectrum can be divided into three segments:

  • The UV (Ultra-violet) spectrum, not visible by humans
  • The human-visible spectrum
  • The IR (infra-red, or thermal) spectrum, not visible by humans

Some animals and insects are able to see in UV and IR. For example, IR vision helps some snakes see their prey in the dark. And UV vision helps insects find flowers. Both UV and IR are invisible to humans. Unless those humans have HQ cameras!

HQ camera sensitivity chart

The core of the HQ camera is the Sony IMX477 sensor array with its 12.3 Megapixel RGB chip. This sensor has good sensitivity in both the IR and UV spectrums. To preserve the "natural" color of photographs and videos, this sensor is equipped with the HOYA CM500 filter and has a Color Filter Array (CFA) on its surface. Removing a CFA is tricky and should generally be left to special companies who focus on that sort of thing. With its CFA removed, however, that 12.3 Megapixel RGB chip will begin to exhibit super powers!

And of course, since StereoPi has two HQ cameras, it can take photographs that show both the visible spectrum and the UV spectrum:

UV photo in 265 nm and 420 nm spectrums

In the photo above, you can see two images of a sunscreen test strip. As you know, all sunscreens are marked with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) that specifies how much UV light they absorb: the higher the SPF, the more they absorb. In the left-hand photo, you can actually see the difference!

Similarly, in the video below, you can see portions of a white paper towel turn black as they are covered in sunscreen.

We were so excited about this that we asked the creators of the above video to share additional technical details. Thanks to Valentin Siderskiy, Aaron Lozhkin, ultravioletphotography.com, and maxmax.com, we now have an article that contains those details! You can read it on our blog: Deep Ultraviolet Imaging Using the Raspberry Pi HQ Camera.

Stay tuned!

About the Author

Eugene Pomazov

StereoPi  ·  Realizator  ·   St. Petersburg


$78,032 raised

of $35,000 goal

222% Funded! Order Below

Product Choices

$49

StereoPi v2 Slim

Perfect for DIY ninjas and those wanting to embed StereoPi in a tight space. This board is the same as the standard edition, but without all the bulky connectors - the Ethernet RJ45 jack, GPIO header, and dual USB Type-A connector have not been populated. To use this board, you will need your own Raspberry Pi Compute Module, cameras, and camera ribbon cables. Two short power cables and three jumpers already included.


$55

StereoPi v2 Standard

The world of stereoscopic video awaits! This board is the ultimate interface between two cameras and a Raspberry Pi Compute Module. It comes with all the bells and whistles, including Ethernet, dual USB ports, GPIO header, microSD slot, HDMI output, and more. To use this board, you will need your own Raspberry Pi Compute Module, cameras, and camera ribbon cables. Two short power cables and three jumpers already included.


$185

StereoPi v2 Camera Kit

Everything you need to assemble your camera! Includes StereoPi Standard, CM4 + external antenna, 2 cameras (IMX219, 160 FOV), a TFT screen, a shot button, camera-mount plates, nuts & bolts, 3 jumpers, a 15 cm tripod, and 2 microSD cards with pre-written SLP and OpenCV images!


$25

StereoPi PoE HAT

This board adds Power over Ethernet option to your StereoPi


$55

StereoPi HQ Metal Housing

Metal housing for a couple of HQ cameras with advanced adjustments features. Includes StereoPi HQ housing base + carriages, 2 x HOYA CM500 filters (8.9 x 8.9 x 1 mm), a set of nuts/bolts/washers for assembly, and a tripod. To use this kit you need a couple of HQ cameras and a couple of C or CS lenses.

Credits

StereoPi

We are a small team of geeks who have been making remote-controlled things with livestreaming video since 2010. We've done everything from boats and planes, to robots, copters, and VR helmets. If we can't find the right tools for our projects, we build them ourselves.


Eugene

Sergey Serov


NexPCB

Recommended

Full-service Manufacturer

See Also

Subscribe to the Crowd Supply newsletter, highlighting the latest creators and projects: