FreeSRP

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Apr 19, 2017

Windows Support, FPGA Design, USB Firmware, and GNU Radio

Windows support!

The FreeSRP can now be used in Windows. libfreesrp was successfully compiled for Windows, requiring only very minor modifications (which will be published soon). Supporting libfreesrp on Windows makes it possible build Pothos SDR with FreeSRP support.

Here is a screenshot of Pothos SDR receiving data through the FreeSRP on Windows 10:

FPGA design and USB controller firmware

The FPGA design and USB controller firmware have now been posted on GitHub.

Additionally, you can find the PDF schematics for the latest FreeSRP revision here.

The full, editable CircuitMaker project will be published very soon!

FreeSRP now supported in upstream gr-osmosdr

FreeSRP support in GNU Radio was previously only available through a custom fork of gr-osmosdr. gr-omsosdr has now merged the changes required to bring FreeSRP compatibility to the official gr-osmosdr library!

$20,050 raised

of $75,000 goal

Funding Unsuccessful

May 19

ended

27%

funded

110

pledges

Product Choices

$420

FreeSRP

A fully assembled FreeSRP software-defined radio and the USB 3.0 cable needed to connect it to your computer.


$15

Laser-cut Acrylic Case

A clear case that can easily be assembled from four layers of laser-cut acrylic and four screws, providing physical protection for your FreeSRP.


$30

Antenna Kit

Choose some antennas to go with your FreeSRP. The standard antenna kit contains two TG.10.0113 multiband dipole antennas (698 MHz - 960 MHz, 1710 MHz - 2690 MHz), but you can choose to replace one or both of the standard antennas with FXUB66 ultra-wideband antennas that work from 700 to 6000 MHz.

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Credits

Lukas Lao Beyer

Software development and electronics have been my hobbies for years. Now, I’m studying Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. My projects are software and electronics related, and I like to keep them completely open-source so anyone can freely modify and redistribute them or use them as inspiration


Lukas Lao Beyer

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