Haasoscope

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Dec 14

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$149

The Haasoscope Bundle

Receive 1 Haasoscope + 2 probes + USB-serial adapter + USB blaster + screen


$119

Your very own Haasoscope!

A fully assembled Haasoscope, preloaded with firmware and ready for data-taking! You also might want to grab a USB-serial adapter (for interfacing to a computer) and/or a USB-blaster (for reprogramming the firmware). Haasoscope will retail for $119 after the end of the campaign.


$229

Haasoscopes are happier together - get two!

Two fully assembled Haasoscopes, preloaded with firmware and ready for data-taking! Again you may want a serial adapter and/or USB-blaster, but you just need one of each for both of them. The 2-pack will retail for $229 after the end of the campaign.


$429

Now we're talking about a serious data-acquisition system - 4 Haasoscopes!

Four fully assembled Haasoscopes, preloaded with firmware and ready for data-taking! Again you may want a serial adapter and/or USB-blaster, but you just need one of each for all four of them. The 4-pack will retail for $429 after the end of the campaign.


$5

USB-serial Adapter

This plugs into your computer (USB port) and then connects to the right side of the Haasoscope (serial RX/TX). It also can power the Haasoscope. You need one of these if your computer doesn't have a serial port, which is almost all modern computers. Arduinos and Raspberry Pi's do talk serial though - you can use them to read out the Haasoscope without an adapter!


$9

USB-blaster

This lets you reprogram the Haasoscope FPGA firmware from either Windows or Linux using the free Altera Quartus II software via the JTAG connector.


$9

A Cool Screen!

This is a 0.96" 128X64 pixel white OLED screen. It communicates with the Haasoscope over an SPI interface, and can show ADC data from a selected channel, or whatever you tell it to! It can plug directly into the header above the FPGA.


$16

Oscilloscope Probes

Two passive 100 MHz bandwidth oscilloscope probes for connecting to Haasoscope 100 MHz ADC inputs using BNC.


$26

Opto-isolated USB-serial Adapter

For those of you probing some dangerous stuff, you can now act crazy without killing your laptop. This USB-serial adapter works just like the standard one, but is opto-isolated, for 1500V of protection!


$15

High-speed USB Readout Board

In case 1.5 Mb/s is not enough bandwidth for you, grab one of these boards and have high-speed USB2 output from a Haasoscope! Using just 8+2 digital outputs on the Haasoscope, you can get about 4 MB/s, about 20x faster than serial, and still use the same python readout code. It's supported in the stock firmware too! Using 8+4 digital outputs, you could in theory even get up to 40 MB/s using C++ readout code and the free FTDI USB libraries.


$35

A Haasoscope Mug!

Drink your coffee in style and support the Haasoscope dream.

Details

Cheap, flexible, data acquisition for all!

As Featured In

MickMake

"There’s been a fair amount of talk about this over at the EEVBlog forums, essentially comparing the bandwidth to dollar ratio. I reckon it’s a pretty decent DSO for the price."

instrumentacionhoy

"Esta placa de adquisición de datos y osciloscopio realizada de forma abierta es capaz de permitir la realización de sistemas altamente complejos"

Haasoscope is the first open source, open hardware, flexible, small, cheap, oscilloscope and data-acquisition board. You can use the stock firmware for basic oscilloscope functionality, or modify the firmware to customize what the Haasoscope does. You can add a fancy trigger algorithm, use the FPGA to process the input data, make use of other analog or digital I/O channels, or whatever! Oh, and just connect two or more Haasoscopes together if you need more input channels!

Haasoscope is also far more powerful than a normal oscilloscope. Imagine trying to build a ping-pong playing robot, a levitating magnetic platform, or a self-navigating drone - you’d need to read in high-speed data from various sensors, analog and digital, process all that data quickly, and respond in real-time. No problem - Haasoscope can handle that, even while running on batteries.

Who Needs It and Why?

If you’re a hobbyist on a budget, there’s no need to buy a $500 scope to debug circuits anymore, even high-speed ones. Haasoscope has all the features you need, plus it’s expandable and customizable, can be powered from USB, and fits in your pocket - all at a fraction of the cost of a full size ‘scope.

Haasoscope is also a great platform for students. They can see high-speed circuits in action, learn FPGA programming, data transmission protocols, etc. - at a price affordable for the classroom. They’re perfect for a lab class in EE, CS, or physics.

You can even use Haasoscope for professional work - scientific research, industrial applications, communications, security, entertainment, finance, … anytime you need to tackle high-speed data on a project. Haasoscope’s flexibility and expandability lets you build a system that meets your needs, whether it’s four channels and solar-powered in a remote desert, or 400 channels monitoring electronic noise levels in a cell-phone tower.

Features & Specifications

  • Four high-speed ADC channels, up to 125 MSPS each, 8-bit, ~60 MHz bandwidth, BNC inputs
  • Switchable oversampling to make two very high speed ADC channels, up to 250 MSPS each
  • Intel/Altera MAX10 FPGA with 8k logic elements and 387 kb of memory (enough for 8k samples / channel for each event)
  • Reprogram firmware over JTAG with free Altera software for Windows or Linux (or Virtualbox on Mac)
  • Python user software for waveform display and control of all features, including FFT
  • Two gains per channel: +-5 V and +-500 mV ranges, with programmable DC offset
  • Switchable AC/DC input, 50/1M Ohm termination for each channel
  • Readout over serial at 1.5 Mb/s, about 20 Hz for four channels of 512 samples each, works with PCs (using optional serial-to-USB adapter), Raspberry Pi, Arduino, etc.
  • Optional 128 x 64 mini display with SPI interface
  • 22 spare high-speed digital I/O (100+ MHz)
  • 16 spare low-speed digital I/O (via I2C bus)
  • Nine additional analog I/O, 1 MSPS (combined) at 12 bits
  • Four programmable LEDs and a reset button
  • USB powered, (or other 5 V input, switchable), ~1 Watt
  • 6.2 x 8.9 cm (just bigger than a credit card)

Comparison Table

Channels Sample rate (MHz) Bandwidth (MHz) Recording depth PC user interface and display Open source firmware, software, hardware Expandable to more channels Price
Haasoscope 4 125 - 250 60 32k Yes Yes! Yes! Yes! Yes! $99
Rigol DS1104Z 4 1000 100 12M No No No No No $619
PicoScope 2205A 2 200 25 16k Yes No No No No $199
Owon VDS1022I 2 100 25 5k Yes No No No No $105
OpenScope 2 6.25 2 ~100k Yes Yes Yes Yes No $79
SmartScope 2 100 45 2k Yes Yes Yes No No $179

Current Status

Protoypes

Haasoscope has been through several prototypes and various rounds of testing/tweaking. There are a few different prototypes seen here on the page. More information on prototypes can be found in the updates section.

Software screenshots

Haasoscope has a full suite of triggering abilities in the stock firmware/software. Shown here is a basic falling edge on chan 6, with time and threshold indicated by the dashed crosshairs.

You can connect Haasoscopes together and show as many channels as you want on the same screen (or turn some off). Triggers and data are synced accurately between connected Haasoscopes!

FFT display is built in (along with other advanced features, like sin(x)/x filtering). Here's a nice clean 5 MHz square wave and its FFT.

Manufacturing Plan

Boards will be produced and assembled by MacroFab in Houston, TX. A few parts will then be soldered on by hand.

Shipping & Fulfillment

Everything will be shipping from Crowd Supply’s warehouse in Portland, Oregon. To learn more about placing your order and shipping, please review this guide.

Risks & Challenges

It’s possible that some bug could be found in the board design, or they are found to be unreliable. This would require an additional board design fix and prototype round. But prototypes have already been tested that work well and have operated nicely for weeks.

Ask a Question

Have a question not answered in the description above or in the Updates?

Ask Andy Haas a Question or Browse the Crowd Supply Guide

Credits

Andy Haas

I teach physics at NYU. I use electronics for research, in teaching, and as a hobby.


Andrew Haas


Seeed Studio

PCBA Manufacturer

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